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Sportsbook Promo Codes - November 2021 Promos

Top Betting Site Promos & Deals November 2021

Sportsbooks are only offering these massive bonuses for a limited time as online sportsbetting is becoming legal across the US.  Here you can find the best offers available for each popular sportsbook as of November 2021.

Using our links below, you’ll be able to claim the biggest bonuses available for popular sites like BetMGM, DraftKings, FanDuel, Caesars, PointsBet, BetRivers and more. Claim all of these bonuses below to secure thousands of dollars in risk-free wagers and deposit matches while you still can!

Current Sportsbook Offers

BetMGM Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

PointsBet Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

DraftKings Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

FanDuel Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

Caesars Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

BetRivers Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

BetMGM Sportsbook

BetMGM Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

PointsBet Sportsbook

PointsBet Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

DraftKings Sportsbook

DraftKings Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

FanDuel Sportsbook

FanDuel Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

Caesars Sportsbook

Caesars Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5

BetRivers Sportsbook

BetRivers Sportsbook

Rating:
5/5
Coins falling from the sky to illustrate free money

Sportsbetting Terms and FAQs

This is the most common bet type and it is just a straight up single bet on a game. A point spread is determined by the oddsmakers with one team being favored by a certain number of points. Let’s take a look at an example line below to give a clear indication of what a straight bet would be:

Boston Celtics -6.5 (-110), moneyline -320

at Cleveland Cavaliers +6.5 (-110), moneyline +260

O/U 206

The Celtics are favored by 6.5 points in this example. This means that if you bet the Cavaliers, you are getting 6.5 points, so if the Cavaliers win the game, or lose by fewer than 7 points, you will win the bet because of your 6.5-point cushion. On the other side, when you are laying 6.5 points as the favorite, you would need the Celtics to win by seven or more to win the bet.

Final Score – Celtics 102, Cavaliers 98. Cavaliers would cover even though the Celtics won the game because the +6.5 spread is enough to cover a 4-point defeat.

A spread, or, point spread, is one of the most popular forms of sports betting. Many of the most popular sports that are wagered upon like football and basketball use point spreads. The spread is created to basically level the playing field of a specific game or matchup. Let’s take an NBA game, as an example. If the Los Angeles Lakers are playing the Chicago Bulls, it’s no secret the Lakers are by far the better team and will win the game at a much higher rate than the Bulls. The better team is considered the “favorite,” which makes the worse team the “underdog.” If we opened up our favorite sportsbook, let’s say we found the line as:

Chicago Bulls (+12.5) vs. Los Angeles Lakers (-12.5).

The Bulls are the underdog and the Lakers are the favorites. The spread of this game is 12.5 points, which means if you wagered your money on the Lakers, they would be required to defeat the Bulls by more than 12 points in order for you to cash your ticket. So, on the flip side, if you wagered on the Bulls, you have two avenues to cashing your ticket: 1) Win the game outright; 2) Lose by a margin of 12 points or less.
For straight bets, an over/under bet is a wager on how many total combined points will be scored in a game by both teams. For example, an NBA game may have an over/under of 210 points, which means that the oddsmakers are projecting a combined points total of 210 between the two teams. If you think the teams are going to score more than 210 points total, you bet the over, and conversely, if you think it’s going to be a defensive struggle, you can bet the under hoping that the total points scored equals 209 points or less.
The moneyline bet is the most simple form of sports betting. Chances are, you’ve probably had about 200 of these types of wagers with your Uncle Frank on the Thanksgiving NFL games over the years, and you didn’t even know it. Unlike betting on a point spread, a moneyline bet is simply a wager that is placed on a team one believes will win the game outright. There are no points a team needs to cover, but there are, however, still favorites and underdogs. Merely picking the winning side is quite easy. Understanding how the moneyline is set and will pay out is a bit of a different story for some. Let’s take one of those Uncle Frank Thanksgiving NFL games for example. Let’s say the Dallas Cowboys are hosting the New York Giants. The moneyline might look something like this:

New York Giants (+200) vs. Dallas Cowboys (-200)

The Giants are represented as the underdog by having the plus next to their number (+200). The plus number indicates how big of an underdog a team is, so if they were +300, +400, or +500, they would be more sever underdogs to win the game. The number also indicates how much money would win in comparison to every $100 you wager. So, the Cowboys are the favorite at (-200). That number also tells you how much money you need to wager in order to win $100. If you were make a $100 moneyline bet on the Giants to upset the Cowboys and the G-Men won the game, you would receive $300 in return ($100 for your original wager, plus the additional $200 profit for the 2:1 odds). If you made a $200 bet on the Cowboys to win and they did, you’d receive the same $300 in return ($200 from your original wager, plus the additional $100 for the profit).
Most wagers are single bets placed on single games, only requiring a single outcome to cash your ticket. A parlay, however, is when a bettor makes one wager on two or more games. The parlay requires all parts of the bet be won in order for the bettor to paid out. What’s enticing about a parlay is the larger payout if all parts of the bet are, indeed, won; whereas a single-game bet generally offers a much smaller return. A larger payout doesn’t come without more risk, as selecting multiple winners is difficult. Let’s say you’re looking at the Sunday NFL lines at your favorite book and you stumble upon two games you think are winners:

Pittsburgh Steelers (+4.5) vs. New England Patriots (-4.5)

Chicago Bears (+6.5) vs. Green Bay Packers (-6.5)

You see the Patriots are only 4.5-point favorites and think the Patriots will cover that spread and win by 5 or more. The Bears are 6.5-point underdogs and since Aaron Rodgers is dealing with a shoulder injury, you think the Bears can either win or lose by 6 or less. Instead of betting each game individually, you roll them together in a parlay to get better odds. For this example, let’s say the Patriots (-4.5) and Bears (+6.5) pays out 2:1. You wager $100, so if the Pats and Bears both cover, you’d receive $300 ($100 for your original bet, and a $200 profit). With two games, the odds aren’t giant, but if you add more games, the odds goes up. Just remember, the odds may look great the more games you add, but the actual chances of winning the wager become exponentially harder with each game you add.

A teaser is a parlay type bet with two or more games that allows the bettor to adjust the point spread on the games, for a lower return if they do in fact cover. There are different types of teasers, like adjusting total points or the spread. The teaser total can change depending on how many teams you’ve selected in the parlay. Let’s look at an example:

You like the following teams in the NFL with their spreads listed below:

Dolphins +8 , Patriots -12 , Bears -7

A standard three team parlay bet of $100 would return $600 on a win. However, if you decide you want to do a three-team teaser rather than a traditional three-team parlay, a six point three team teaser would allow you to bet the following adjusted lines:

Dolphins +14 , Patriots -6, Bears -1

For this six point three-team teaser, a bet of $100 would return $91 on a win.

As you can see, the six point teaser adjusts the line six points in your favor on each game, making the bet easier to win. However, just like a parlay you have to win all three, and instead of being paid 6-1, a six point, three-team teaser in football pays the same as a traditional -110 straight bet. As I said, there are all different types of teasers, so you can certainly experiment with  different combos and payoffs.

One of the most important concepts when getting into betting is understanding breakeven points based on the moneyline spread you are betting. The starting point for this analysis is understanding the juice that comes with any bet. Simply, this is a tax you pay for the privilege of placing a wager. For a standard bet, the juice is usually -110 (or 10% vig), which means you have to pay $110 to win $100. The extra 10% you are paying goes to the house. It’s important to understand how much juice you are required to pay because there are times when the house will increase the juice on a standard bet. This is done based on numerous factors, which we will delve into in subsequent articles.

Hedging a bet can have a lot of different variations and can be used in all different situations, but the basic definition is when you place different bets on multiple outcomes to either reduce your risk or lock in a guaranteed profit. One of the most common questions I get on betting in our premium Slack chat at Awesemo.com is what a person should do if they want to try and lock in profits on a future bet where they can potentially hedge and guarantee a return.

I want to be clear that in most circumstances you are better off not hedging, as you will give up some slight value, but each situation depends on risk tolerance. Regardless, it is important to know how to hedge correctly if you choose to go that route.

Let’s look at an example to paint a clearer picture where hedging can come into play.

Say last year you decided to bet the Rams to win the Super Bowl before the season at 10/1 odds, meaning for every dollar you bet you receive $10 back. A $100 bet would return $1,000 and come February, the Rams are in the Big Game and your ticket is still alive. They are a one-point favorite over the Chiefs and as it stands now. If the Rams win, you win $1,000, and if the Chiefs win, you lose the bet for minus $100. There is an opportunity here to guarantee profits by betting the Chiefs if you are looking to lower your risk and secure a win regardless.

Rams future bet 10/1 : $100 to win $1,000

Chiefs bet +1 : $440 to win $400

If the Rams win, you win your $1,000 future minus the Chiefs bet of $440, leaving you with $560 profit. If the Chiefs win, you win your bet for $400 minus the Rams future of $100 leaving you with $300 profit. As you can see, in this scenario, you are guaranteed a minimum of $300 profit and a maximum of $560 instead of a minus $100 to $1,000 range if you kept the original bet. The amount bet on the Chiefs can vary depending on how much variance you want in your potential winnings.

 

Why does Hedging Matter?

Understanding how hedging works is important even if the majority of the time you choose to let your original bet ride and not lock in any profit. If you are betting futures or other bets where you may be holding tickets with massive odds and potential payoffs, hedging is something that you should know how to do properly, as it can guarantee you lock in some profit regardless of whether or not you fully connect on that big future bet. There are other types of hedging where you can actually hit both bets known as “middles”, and we will get into that as we expand upon this topic in the future.

 

A bankroll is one of the most important things to not only have, but understand, before you even think about attempting sports wagering. Your bankroll is defined as: the amount of money an individual has to gamble with. Let’s say the NFL season is beginning and you’re planning to wager throughout the season. You have put away $500 heading into Week 1 and claimed that as your “NFL betting money.” Thus, your bankroll is $500. It’s a simple concept, but many — especially newer, inexperienced — bettors fail to stay within their allotted bankroll. Here is a short list of common bankroll mistakes:

  • Betting more on games you love
  • Betting less on games you dislike
  • Doubling down because you’re on a heater and overconfident
  • Chasing to try to win large sums back after a losing streak
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